Art shows that began in 1980s continue in south metro area

Curtis, Depot galleries hold exhibits in Littleton and Greenwood Village

Posted 8/14/18

Once upon a time, 35 years ago, two long-running south area galleries decided to hold juried exhibits open to all Colorado artists — and issued a call to artists to enter what each called the …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution of $25 or more in Nov. 2018-2019, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Art shows that began in 1980s continue in south metro area

Curtis, Depot galleries hold exhibits in Littleton and Greenwood Village

Posted

Once upon a time, 35 years ago, two long-running south area galleries decided to hold juried exhibits open to all Colorado artists — and issued a call to artists to enter what each called the “All Colorado Art Show.”

In 2018, both exhibits continue and are both very much worthy of a visit and attention from art lovers and art makers! One is at the Littleton Fine Arts Guild’s Depot Art Gallery, 2069 W. Powers Ave. in downtown Littleton, and the other is at Curtis Center for the Arts, 2349 E. Orchard Road, Greenwood Village.

I have wondered about confusion in the arts community over the duplication of names, but each year there are many more entries to both than can fit in available space — and every year, a professional juror chooses an engaging collection of works in each gallery, so I’ve decided to stop worrying about names and simply enjoy the artwork. Just please make time to visit both!

Patricia Aaron, of Greenwood Village, an internationally recognized artist who paints with encaustic (hot wax) and sculpts, was juror for the show at Curtis, which opened July 14 in the beautifully renovated old schoolhouse/gallery.

At her July 26 talk, she explained that her criteria for choosing one work over another involved the medium, the content and the technique … “I wanted to create a show that’s even, with different genre: abstract, figurative, landscape, photographic and marked `yes, no, maybe’ on the next (third) look through CAFÉ entries.”

She looked at all 525 entries one day and again on the next day before she began to select the 66 that are exhibited in the show, which runs through Aug. 25.

This is the first year that included printmaking and photography, Aaron said. She mentioned a difference in the quality of the photographs submitted and urges artists to always submit the best possible photos on CAFÉ (the Call for Entry website) when they apply for a spot in a competitive exhibit.

Curtis director Chris Stevens determined where each selected piece would hang and his thoughtful placement enhances each work.

The First Place award went to Paonia sculptor Maeve Eichelberger for her “Rodeo Blues,” a large, decorative acrylic image of a saddle. It is beautifully crafted and presented and stands front and center in the middle gallery at Curtis. Second Place was awarded to “At the Beach,” a large abstract painting by Karen Scharer, while Tawnya Williams’ portrait, “Chalk it Up!,” skillfully rendered with colored pencil, received Third Place.

Aaron says 1,400 people have visited the gallery in July and three pieces had sold when we talked last week.

Curtis Center for the Arts is open Mondays through Saturdays. Admission is free and there is parking just east of the building, which sits at the edge of Curtis Park.

A line of art lovers waited to step inside the little red Depot Art Gallery when its All Colorado Art Show opened on Aug. 3. (It was also First Friday in downtown Littleton, which has been well-attended.)

The annual exhibit is part of Littleton’s Western Welcome Week celebration.

Juror Joan Kresek was on hand to announce winners: three 2D and three more in 3D, which is a nice plan. Kresek, who is presently on the faculty at Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design, calls her own art “contemporary realism.” She said there were 174 entries, with 64 works by 56 artists accepted for the Littleton show.

Her choice for First Place in 2D was “In My Dream I Burst,” an oil painting by Paula Peacock, a traditionally painted still life, with a dark background, carefully lit vase and bouquet of branches with balloons floating on string.

Fine technique plus a sense of humor … That humor continued to the delightful First Place 3D work: “Study in Resilience III” by Cumee Fink. Reminiscent of the many trophy heads displayed across the West, it is a really clever assemblage piece, with a traditional brass drawer pull snout and its bovine head filled with empty shells — and some flowers.

Big ears flap at the sides and a collection of gear chains, cogs and other hardware look ready to clank at any minute. A straight face is not an option for the visitor!

Laurie Sorkin’s Second Place oil painting, “Iris in Sunlight,” is a skillfully rendered image of three big sunny orange/pink flowers that are so welcome in spring gardens. The wall in the back room is an especially harmonious collection of Western color canyon photography by guild members.

The colors just radiate and invite one to look at other smaller works in the room — and at a nice selection of note cards by members, which are a great little gift in themselves.

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.