Letter to the editor: Money goes where needs are

Posted 9/25/18

Money goes where needs are Joy Overbeck questioned why charter schools were getting only a small percentage of the DCSD bond issue 5B on this November’s ballot. There are several reasons why …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution of $25 or more in Nov. 2018-2019, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Letter to the editor: Money goes where needs are

Posted

Money goes where needs are

Joy Overbeck questioned why charter schools were getting only a small percentage of the DCSD bond issue 5B on this November’s ballot. There are several reasons why district-owned buildings receive the bulk of the bond funding. A majority of the bond money will address the Tier 1 (health and safety) needs for schools built before 2006, as defined in the 2018-2019 Master Capital Plan. Most charter schools were built after 2006. Taxpayers should want capital funds to go to schools with the most significant needs. Providing adequate maintenance ensures students are being educated in a safe environment. It would be fiscally irresponsible to give equal amounts of money to American Academy Lincoln Meadows, which opened last year, and Douglas County High School, opened in 1961. Homeowners apply home maintenance dollars to rooms with the greatest need, not equally to every room in the house.

Complex state and federal statutes dictate how school districts provide capital funding to charter schools; it’s not a simple pass-through of money like the mill levy override. Charter schools have access to grants and other alternative sources for funding not available to neighborhood schools. Charter schools receive about $300 per-pupil revenue per year from Colorado for capital needs — money not available to district-owned buildings.

The district’s plan makes common sense. Vote Yes on 5A & B!

Catherine Lees

Highlands Ranch

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.