Letter to the editor: No need for tax hike

Posted 9/11/18

No need for tax hike The DougCo School Board will ask taxpayers for both a $40 million mill levy override (MLO) and a $250 million bond issue, which means much higher taxes for DougCo residents. …

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Letter to the editor: No need for tax hike

Posted

No need for tax hike

The DougCo School Board will ask taxpayers for both a $40 million mill levy override (MLO) and a $250 million bond issue, which means much higher taxes for DougCo residents. About $17 million of the $40 million MLO would be spent on higher teacher pay. But since teachers are part-time workers should we be paying them more than $53,080 (average salary according to Colorado Department of Education)?

According to the 2018-19 Douglas County School District calendar, teachers will be teaching students 169 days plus 12 days of professional training (conferences, etc. without students) for a total of 181 working days.

Thus, teachers actually work (assuming an eight-hour day and a two week vacation) only 72.4 percent of the hours of other workers — and they have full medical and generous retirement unlike most part-time employees. They take second jobs because they only work part-time in their teaching jobs. If teachers worked full time they would be making an average $73,314 a year.

Money can be saved without hiking taxes. Public charter schools save the district and taxpayer huge construction costs because they must finance or lease their own school buildings. But though the district’s own survey found citizens want more STEM (science, tech, engineering and math) schools, the board has denied two out of two charter applications, one of which was a STEM.

And why is only $3 million to $9 million of the $250 million bond going to the charters for repairs and security when they represent 20 percent of DougCo schools?

Joy Overbeck

Parker

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