New Castle Pines mayor ready for road ahead

Councilmember Tera Radloff will succeed Jeffrey Huff in January

Julie A. Taylor
Special to Colorado Community Media
Posted 11/22/17

Tera Radloff will step into the Castle Pines mayoral office with a long list of priorities. “I’ve committed to a pretty detailed to-do list, and people are holding me accountable to that,” …

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New Castle Pines mayor ready for road ahead

Councilmember Tera Radloff will succeed Jeffrey Huff in January

Posted

Tera Radloff will step into the Castle Pines mayoral office with a long list of priorities.

“I’ve committed to a pretty detailed to-do list, and people are holding me accountable to that,” Radloff said. “This community has my heart. I’m so excited to be leading it.”

Radloff, a Ward 1 councilmember and the mayor pro tem, won 62 percent of the vote Nov. 7 in her race against Ward 3 Councilmember Geoff Blue. Radloff will take over for term-limited Mayor Jeffrey Huff.

Although Radloff doesn’t assume the position until January, she jokes that she already feels behind on her list of projects, one of which she promised to complete within the first 90 days of her term.

Her main goal, which she plans to execute by April, is to fix the local roads, which she admits the local government is failing to properly maintain. To do this, she wants more community engagement and partnerships, and to discuss and weigh options with the city staff and professionals in the field. The proposed solution would then go through city council before going to a public vote.

“We’ve been trying to do it ourselves, and struggling a little bit,” Radloff said. “I don’t have to be the smartest person in the room, but I can get the smartest people together.”

Through the Castle Pines Chamber of Commerce, she wants to work with existing businesses, and draw in new names like Trader Joe’s and Snooze an A.M. Eatery.

Unlike much of Douglas County, planning for a major population increase is not a concern of Radloff’s since there isn't much real estate left for development, with the exception of the neighborhoods currently under construction.

“We’re kind of limited by boundaries,” Radloff said. “Everybody thinks we're growing like crazy, and we are growing to some extent, but not like Castle Rock and Parker.”

Radloff became interested in joining the council after the councilmember for Ward 1 moved out of the jurisdiction. Since she already attended meetings, she decided to have a voice in city matters by becoming a councilmember in 2010.

She credits her commitment to public servitude to her father. Although her dad served as a military colonel, the accomplished pianist would often play for the children’s choir.

“I do believe in being a servant leader,” Radloff said. “My dad was in the military and I think that’s something he showed me from a young age: how to be involved and give back. I lead by the example he set.”

Radloff not only does that through her roles in local government, but also by serving on the Douglas County Library board and operations chair and secretary of the board for Colorado Springs’ Genny’s Hope Foundation. The foundation, which works to help those with blood cancers, has found 126 bone marrow matches and contributed almost $70,000 to the cause.

“Lives of leukemia patients have literally been saved because of the hard work Tera and so many other dedicated volunteers give to Genny's Hope," Genny’s Hope Founder and President Ann Heahn said. "Tera's loyalty and compassion for those suffering from blood cancers is evident from the years of service she continues to provide to the foundation.”

Radloff moved to Colorado at the age of 12, and she and her husband Jon, a business executive with the National Cable Television Cooperative, bought their Castle Pines home 14 years ago. She dotes on her "assistant," a standard poodle named Lincoln.

“I have a wonderful life,” Radloff said. “I have this very handsome little boy in a poodle suit, and a handsome honey.”

She has a degree in finance from Baylor University in Waco, Texas, and she used to be a program manager in the cable industry. In her free time, Radloff loves to exercise, often in the great outdoors, by running, hiking, snowshoeing and an occasional round of golf.

“This is something I enjoy doing, something I can give back,” Radloff said. “I have the time, and I have the passion.”

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