Paint & curb appeal do matter when selling your home

PAM PECCOLO/SPECIAL TO COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA
Posted 4/10/18

Fresh paint has a way of making a home look new inside and out. The transformation can be helpful if you feel the need for an updated look or are thinking it’s time to sell your home.

But …

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Paint & curb appeal do matter when selling your home

Posted

Fresh paint has a way of making a home look new inside and out. The transformation can be helpful if you feel the need for an updated look or are thinking it’s time to sell your home.

But painting may not be necessary for every homeowner who wants to sell. Painting needs to be kept in context with all the other updates or improvements that might be planned.

“Painting is important for resale,but it’s not necessary in every case,” said Kevin Salley, co-owner of the The Prevail Group, a Littleton-based real

estate firm.

Kevin specializes in working with clients selling a home, along with his wife, and co-owner, Amy Salley, who helps home buyers.

“We discourage people from painting a house unless the color is poor, the paint is faded, cracked and peeling, or there is significant damage that needs

to be fixed and then painted,” Kevin added. “When it comes to paint color, we don’t recommend that you go too trendy. If selling, pick a color that appeals to the masses. Warm grays are very popular and we’re really liking Worldly Gray from Sherwin-Williams,” Amy said. “It works with a range of finishes and colors, including black, brown, gold, stainless steel and chrome.”

Add curb appeal value to your home Curb appeal is the initial, first impression people experience when they drive up to a home and look around.

“You can’t put a dollar value on curb appeal,” said Kevin. “Before people even go in the house, buyers look at the style of the house, at whether the yard is clean and tidy, and if the landscaping is well manicured. About 60 percent of customers look at the

neighbors’ yards to evaluate what they think of the neighborhood.”

Today, most buyers have some sense of the house and street they’re interested in by looking at Google Earth and its street views.

“So, we highly recommend sellers finish all the home improvements and painting before a property is listed,” Kevin added.

Amy said even homes that aren’t as up-to-date can be beautiful because buyers are looking for a home that has been well maintained.

“If you have a bathroom with 10-year-old, flowery, yellow wallpaper, having that removed and painted can

update the space and help it look more contemporary,” Amy said.

Getting a return on your home improvement Both buyers and sellers frequently think the cost of home improvements and painting will be more expensive

than it should be.

“A lot of sellers think updates to their home will cost thousands of dollars,” Kevin said. “But, improvements should typically run from $2 to $2.50 per square foot.”

A good real estate agent can assess improvements needed to sell a home and recommend the ones that will have the greatest value.

“One time, we had a client who had replaced his home’s furnace because he thought that would help sell his house,” Kevin said. “He came to us after he’d made the replacement, and we had to tell him when he sold his home he probably wouldn’t get that

equal value out of the house because some things, like furnaces, are not changes that generate a great return.”

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