Castle Rock advances interchange reconstruction plans

Funding for project will depend on election results

Thelma Grimes
tgrimes@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 10/27/21

The Castle Rock Town Council has approved a service agreement to begin the relocation of Dawson Ridge Boulevard and West Frontage Road as part of the $75 million Interstate 25 and Crystal Valley …

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Castle Rock advances interchange reconstruction plans

Funding for project will depend on election results

Posted

The Castle Rock Town Council has approved a service agreement to begin the relocation of Dawson Ridge Boulevard and West Frontage Road as part of the $75 million Interstate 25 and Crystal Valley Interchange project, which is contingent on results of the election that ends Nov. 2.

In the election, the town is asking voters to approve four separate tax measures, including pausing TABOR for 10 years to pay for the interchange reconstruction and for more police and fire personnel.

While the election isn’t over, Town Manager David Corliss said the town has to move forward as if it is approved to stay on track.

During the Oct. 19 council meeting, the council approved a $300,000 service agreement between the town and CORE Consultants to complete preconstruction services for the relocation of Dawson Ridge Boulevard and a portion of West Frontage Road.

The approved measure includes $30,000 in contingency funding in case the project goes over budget.

Before voting in favor of the agreement, Councilmember Laura Cavey asked whether there there was a need for the agreement and if the town get the $300,000 back if residents do not approve the tax measure to fund the entire reconstruction project.

Corliss said no matter what the results of the election on Nov. 2 are, the reconstruction project is a necessity and the Colorado Department of Transportation has said the town will manage it. Corliss said if the town is going to manage it, then it is only appropriate that the town builds and designs it even if other revenue avenues have to be sought out after the election.

The town is working with CDOT and Douglas County on the next steps for the I-25 and Crystal Valley Interchange. As part of that project, a portion of the existing frontage road will be removed to construct the interchange’s southbound on/off ramps. Dawson Ridge Boulevard will serve as the new north-south connection in the area between Territorial and Tomah roads.

The approved agreement allows CORE Consultants to develop a design for Dawson Ridge Boulevard to tie into the western interchange intersection at Territorial Road. Design of the roadway and drainage infrastructure to tie into Douglas County’s portion also would be part of the project. That portion will extend from the town’s southern boundary to Tomah Road.

In a presentation to council, Director of Public Works Dan Sailer said the project is scheduled for completion in 2022. Construction of Dawson Ridge Boulevard, along with the county’s portion, would be coordinated with construction of the interchange, which is planned for 2023 but is contingent on funding and voter approval of November ballot measure 2D, he said.

During the Oct. 19 meeting, the council also recognized the 2021 graduating class of the Your Town Academy program.

Now in its sixth year, Assistant Town Manager Kristin Read said participating citizens go through eight classes of 2 1/2 hours apiece that focus on town business. Read said the students learn about the town’s various boards and commissions, get educated on parks and recreation programs, participate in tours and in using town equipment.

With 30 residents participating each year, Read estimated more than 130 citizens have graduated from the education program.

Later in the meeting when councilmembers discussed possible language changes to how proposals, developments and initiatives are approved, Cavey said the citizens academy is helpful because it helps address the common misconceptions residents have in how projects get approved.

In a 6-1 vote, with Councilmember Caryn Johnson objecting, the council voted to add language to staff recommendations to council. Instead of the customary recommendation for approval from staff, councilmembers will now see text that states they can approve or approve with conditions.

The original proposal called for an option to deny specific projects be added. Mayor Pro Tem Kevin Bracken said the option to approve and deny all projects is already an option for councilmembers. He made a motion to remove the denial portion of the options.

Johnson disagreed with removing the word “deny” as a voting option, pointing out to council that other towns such as Parker follows the similar procedures in considering town business.

In voting in favor of Bracken’s motion, Mayor Jason Gray said having the word “deny” in the options could be confusing for residents.

“It creates more work and creates more confusion for citizens when they say we had the option to deny it and we didn’t,” he said.

In other business, the council approved measures to continue moving forward with amending sections of the Castle Rock Municipal Code regarding board and commission membership, term limits and bylaws, and adding oath of office terms.

With staff recommendations and initial input from council, discussions will continue at a future council meeting.

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