Construction on the I-25 'Gap' steams ahead

CDOT begins work on southernmost edge of I-25 project between Castle Rock and Monument

Posted 2/1/19

While work continues on the northern end of an 18-mile stretch of Interstate 25 dubbed the Gap, the Colorado Department of Transportation has announced the next leg of construction is ready to begin. …

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Construction on the I-25 'Gap' steams ahead

CDOT begins work on southernmost edge of I-25 project between Castle Rock and Monument

Posted

While work continues on the northern end of an 18-mile stretch of Interstate 25 dubbed the Gap, the Colorado Department of Transportation has announced the next leg of construction is ready to begin.

The Gap project is projected to wrap up in 2022, and once done, will have added an Express Lane to I-25 in each direction between Castle Rock and Monument. Other modifications include replacing bridges, constructing wildlife crossings, widening shoulders and more.

The $350 million project is one of three massive undertakings in the state, said CDOT spokesman Bob Wilson, naming work on Interstate 70 in northeast Denver and on north I-25 near Johnstown as the other two.

Work on the Gap began south of Castle Rock in September, and by this summer the entire 18-mile stretch will be under active construction, making it the longest work zone in the state.

By late January, crews were poised to begin construction on the Gap's southernmost seven-mile segment, beginning at Greenland Road south of Larkspur and ending at Monument.

Changes will include the new toll lanes, wider shoulders, three new wildlife crossings, a reconstruction of the Greenland Road interchange and new ramps at County Line Road, which divides Douglas and El Paso counties.

There will be overnight lane closures in the area, so crews can lay out a work zone with concrete barriers. Daytime lane closures will only occur in the event of an emergency.

Two lanes of traffic will remain open in each direction during peak hours. Travelers should expect narrower lanes and shoulders and a reduced speed limit of 65 mph.

Closures of ramps at Greenland Road and County Line Road could last for up to a week as crews reconstruct the on- and off-ramps. Signs will direct drivers to follow detours.

Work has yet to begin on the middle segment of the Gap, between Greenland Road and Skyview Lane, or Tomah Road. This will be the most complex phase, according to CDOT. Bridges at Upper Lake Gulch Road, Spruce Mountain Road and Plum Creek will be replaced, on top of an added wildlife crossing.

In December, CDOT announced a new Bustang bus line would begin service between Colorado Springs and the Denver Tech Center, with a goal of alleviating commuter traffic on the Gap and I-25.

"In addition to helping reduce traffic on I-25, the route will provide service for people from the Colorado Springs area who have been seeking more direct access to their place of employment," CDOT Director of Transit and Rail David Krutsinger said in a statement. "With a couple of stops at the light rail stations, it'll provide additional options for people who want to travel to other parts of the Denver Metropolitan Area."

Anyone needing to travel the Gap can find weekly updates at i25gap.cdot.gov, follow the project on social media or sign up for text alerts.

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